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At some point, even if you're a Louisiana native, you've found yourself wondering what the person in front of you just said. We have a crazy amount of dialects that are spoken throughout the state. While we're a little more 'country' here in northwest Louisiana, we've got a ton of different French, Creole, Spanish, and Cajun inflections and influences when it comes to our way of speaking. And if we're being honest, in Louisiana, if we don't know how to say something, we just say it really fast and slur it all together. Problem solved!

Reddit user Pompous_Pilot posted this pronunciation guide that he was given several years ago when started a new sales job in New Orleans and it's gotten over 1,300 replies.

Take a look at the handout and tell us what you think.

Reddit via user Pompous Pilot
Reddit via user Pompous Pilot
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Now I don't know about you, but a few of these seem a little off, but I'm no linguistics expert. Where in the world is 'champagne' pronounced as 'sham-pine?' Nowhere I've ever been! How about the way they say you should say Fauchaeaux? Wouldn't that be 'fo-show?' As for how to say Delaune, I've always heard it pronounced like 'de-lawn.' They also say you should pronounce Billiot as 'bill-yaht.' I've always thought you said it like 'bee-o.' The 't' is silent. However, other Reddit users weren't silent on these pronunciations, either. What say you? Did they get it mostly right? Inquiring minds want to know!

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Louisiana Vampire Author Anne Rice's New Orleans Mansion is For Sale

Before famed Louisiana author Anne Rice died in December of 2021, she brought us an incredible wealth of literature. Starting in 1976 with her first published book Interview with the Vampire, Rice captured the imagination of fans around the world. In total she penned 36 novels, including four under the nom de plume A.N. Roquelaure, two more under a different pen name (Anne Rampling), one with her son, Christopher Rice, and one non-fiction book. Her success brought her enough money to purchase this historic (and reportedly haunted) mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Now, this magnificent piece of literary history is up for sale - and it's even been reduced. The price has been slashed by $600,000, and now sits just below the $4 million mark.

If you like what you see, and you'd like to live like the Louisiana Vampire Queen Anne Rice did - just visit the realtor's page and put in an offer!