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From 2020census.gov

So the United States Census couldn't have come in a worse year. Just about the time that government workers began their ten year head count of all of those blessed to live here in America, we get dealt with a full-on crisis in the form of the COVID-19 pandemic.

So, they got together in some big conference room in DC I'm sure, and regrouped with a new plan to properly count those living from sea to shining sea, but somehow they're still amazed that states like Louisiana are running behind in coming up with the accurate numbers.

Hello? This is Louisiana. We don't even buy our wives' flowers until Valentine's morning, and you're wondering why we might be a little tardy with this? In case you haven't noticed, we've been listed as one of the states hit hardest by coronavirus and that's brought on its own set of problems.

Schools were closed, concerts cancelled, and you still can't even go to your favorite bar for a longneck.

However, we Louisianans need to remember that every person not counted in the census represents about $2,500 in lost federal funding. In a report from the Louisiana Radio Network, United States Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says the national response rate to the Census is 64% and Louisiana is falling short at 58%.

“And the problem with that is, that every person that’s under counted, is going to cost your community $2,300 a year for the next ten years,” says Ross.

He goes on to say that being under counted in the Census could adversely affect funding for schools, roads and hospitals and could also affect Congressional representation.

According to the website, 2020census.gov, 

The Census Bureau is working to complete data collection as quickly and safely as possible, while ensuring a complete and accurate count as it strives to comply with the law and statutory deadlines. All offices are schedule to complete their work by September 30, 2020.

 

You are required by law to answer the Census and Ross says the questionnaire takes approximately 10 minutes to complete, if not you will be visited by a Census worker.

 

So, come on Louisiana. Let's get on this! They're trying to wrap things up by September 30th and Louisiana needs all the help it can get.