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It was early December when we saw - on an official website, no less - the idea of "COVID Camps." It was a, back then at least, far-fetched scenario where the federal government could forcibly remove Americans from their homes and place them in what they call :green zones."

Here it is, verbatim, not from some tin-foil hat paranoid in a shack in the woods, but from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cdc.gov:

"The shielding approach aims to reduce the number of severe COVID-19 cases by limiting contact between individuals at higher risk of developing severe disease and the general population.

"The shielding approach aims to reduce the number of severe COVID-19 cases by limiting contact between individuals at higher risk of developing severe disease and the general population."

No doubt, "shielding" sounds far more benign than actually saying, "being forcibly taken from your home by law enforcement," but is there really a difference? Again, from cdc.gov:

"...the shielding approach suggests physically separating high-risk individuals from the general population to prioritize the use of the limited available resources and avoid implementing long-term containment measures among the general population."

Well, while the theory of "COVID Camps' being pitched on a government website is one thing, the state of New York is actually considering legislation that would codify the removal of citizens from their homes. From dailycaller.com:

 "A bill being introduced in the New York State Assembly would allow the governor and other health officials to detain anyone suspected of being a “carrier” of a contagious disease, like the coronavirus."

In a nutshell, the ultra-liberal New York state legislators will soon vote on a measure that allows the governor, during a state of health emergency, to take steps to detain any individuals sick or suspected of being sick. The proposed legislation reads:

"Upon determining by clear and convincing evidence that the health of others is or may be endangered by a case, contact or carrier, the governor may, after consulting the health commissioner, order the removal and/or detention of such a person or of a group of such persons by issuing a single order, identifying such persons either by name or by a reasonably specific description of the individuals or group being detained."

Let's clarify. Once again, from dailycaller.com:

"Persons detained would be held in a 'medical facility' or another “appropriate facility or premises designated by the governor” for no longer than three days, but could be held longer.

"If a detained person is ordered to be kept past three days they can request a release. The governor would then be obligated to apply for a court order authorizing the extended detention after three days after under the legislation."

The good news is that various versions of the bill have been previously introduced and were almost immediately dismissed as unconstitutional. But Republican legislator Kieran Lalor is still fearful. He says at dailycaller.com, "“If this Gulag Bill became law, useful idiots in the press would likely provide cover. By the time the constitutionality of detaining people without due process was adjudicated by the courts, it would be too late."

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