There are few things you can do in the kitchen that can actually endanger your health. One of them is to eat under-cooked chicken or poultry. Any time you cook chicken, it has to be cooked all the way through to a certain temperature to ensure all food borne pathogens are killed off. In raw chicken, salmonella can be present, and it's a nasty bug that causes all sorts of painful and gross symptoms, and in some extreme cases even death.

And that's why when a Texas woman posted a picture of "medium rare chicken strips" she had just cooked and was about to eat, Facebook went bonkers trying to tell her she was about to die.

Dakota Jean, from Stephenville, Texas posted this picture, with the post:

Just made medium rare chicken strips. Theyre so good cant believe I havent tried it like this before. Cant wait to dig in with my homemade salad and veges. #healthy #newyearsresolution #clean #cleaneating #vegan

Facebook.com - Dakota Jean

Vegan? We'll get back to that.

Hundreds of people attempted to rescue the poor woman from her costly mistake by telling her she'll get sick from salmonella, to which she responded several times, "but it's not salmon...it's chicken," and if anyone tried to correct her, she would shut them down by telling them, "you better check your facts, bud."

The comments ranged from concerned for her health to encouraging her continued mastery of the cooking arts. And somewhere in the middle, just a bunch of people calling her stupid. And she took it all in stride, because no matter what anyone said, it was a delicious dinner and she can't wait to make it again.

But...you see...it was all a joke. She was never serious. She never ate any of that. She was just riling up Facebook, which is pretty easy if you just go along with it. The "#vegan" was a nice touch.

Well played, Dakota. Well played.

By the way, just for future reference, the U.S. Dept. Of Agriculture states that all poultry (breasts, whole bird, legs, thighs, and wings, ground poultry, and stuffing) should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165 °F (73.9 °C).

Never "medium rare."