I am really feeling guilty about something I did this week. I do try to do my best to shop local and patronize local restaurants.

But Mudbugs General Manager Scott Muscutt recommended I read a book to help me get motivated to make changes to improve my health during 2021. The book is called The Dip.

I decided to get the book. Usually I am very impulsive and would run out and buy it right away. But in this case, I checked on the Barnes and Noble website. It said they had the book for $14.95 or something close to $15 dollars. But then I clicked over to Amazon and found the book for $10.95. I would have to wait a few days to get the book which I decided was worth the $4 dollars. But since I ordered from Amazon, I was given access to the first few chapters on my digital devices.

This is something millions of Americans are doing, but what harm is this having on businesses in all of our communities? I do pay sales tax on Amazon purchases, but the local store loses me for this purchase and any other purchases I might have made if I stopped by the store. Knowing my habits, I would easily have purchased a couple of other books and probably a 2021 calendar.

What's the answer to this  dilemma? I'm not really sure. But I thought it was worth it to me to wait a couple of days to save the $4 dollars. I know, this sounds like I'm a cheapskate and lazy and perhaps that is true. But the trend to this kind of shopping is widespread. Online sales are up 49% this year. That's a huge number. Will that drop off next year? We will have to wait and see.

 

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